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, the medicare c is the money, the federal government says the money. but there is the different costs associated with the subsidies would extend coverage and the medicaid expansion. so it's not exactly a win-win situation according to the analysis that the kaiser family foundation has conducted. >> i do endorse her briefing that we did in december. a lot of different materials and a webcast that you can watch. we have several related questions and maybe john can take the first crack at it. it has to do with medicare advantage plans. they ask generally how does star rating system works. that is related to a question that was not asked here, but was passed by the senate office, which ask how come a lot of money went to three-star plans this time around. we could relate that to this question. they are related. explain how it is scheduled to take effect. i understand that only about 4% may have taken effect now. do you anticipate that some of the problems that you have referred to and perhaps lesser benefits could show up in this again. >> i will try my best to answer every question. before the affo
households and the government. we project an inflation adjusted gdp will increase by about 1.5% in 2013. it would increase roughly 1.5 percentage point faster were it not for that fiscal tightening. under current law we expect the unemployment rates will stay above 7.5% through next year. that would make 2014 the sixth consecutive year with them -- with unemployment so high since the 1930's. we expect gdp will pick up to 3.5% in 2014 and the following four years. the gaps between the gdp and what it is capable of producing on a sustained basis will still not close quickly. under current law we expect output to remain below potential levels until 2017, nearly a decade after the recession started in december 2007. the nation has paid and will continue to pay a big price for the recession and slow recovery. we estimate the total loss in output relative to the potential in 2007 to 2017 will be equivalent to half of the total output of the -- the total outlook the country produced last year. the federal budget deficit will shrink in 2013 for the fourth year in a row. an estimated $845 billio
think it will have a shocking effect on so many agencies of the government that, hopefully -- >> what do you think it will take for people to say, finally, let's get together and figure out a way to not let this happen. >> because to the military are the most severe. that will require the layoffs of thousands of employees could not to mention military operations and maintenance. but also these cuts will affect every agency, every operation of the government, except social security, medicare, medicaid, and food stamps. those are exempt. but every other agency of the -- other agency or program will receive a cut, probably 5% around it. but since we're willing to the fiscal year, the balance of the year, these few months, you will see these cuts have a greater impact than 5% for the year. >> the way this thing is designed, he does oppose you can believe identity program levels. not every account or agency is important. if i was the culture secretary, i might be more concerned about need inspections. but they don't have the flexibility to do anything about this. do you want to try to give th
that put big, big bets. we're lucky we have mit and caltech, but we are not at the country, the government side or the corporate side, putting those investments together and that's what i worry about. we're not investing more into it, when not going to be the ones that read the benefits. >> i think that's the question. is their net, whatever its taking place, in basic technology to support the stuff that you want to do. >> it's the case were lots of research as an economist would put a social -- the private return is insufficient to generate the private sector. and so that's why i think we have to look for more of these types of partnerships between government, industry. so one good example of this is collaboration that the federal government has with the semiconductor industry, where, so simply no amount institutions like bell labs, which created large investments in developing the first transistor, government and industry are now cosponsoring a series of university-based centers of excellence at mit and stanford and berkeley and ucla that our first alternative figure how do we take, as f
pays billions in fines for the gulf oil spill then gets billions more in government contracts. lindsey graham announce he will continue to block lady gaga's tour until she provides more answers about benefit -- benghazi. >>> starting with the senate and majority leader harry reid. >> republicans have made an unfortunate choice to ratchet up the level of destruction here in washington. just when you thought things couldn't get worse it gets worse. >> john: because today senate republicans blocked former republican senator chuck hagel's nomination to become the nation's next secretary of defense. this is the first time, friends in our nation's history that a filibuster has been used to block a president's nominee for that position. the final tally 58 for 40 against and one senator utah's orrin hatch voted present. wow, harry you couldn't see this coming, to cow? senator reid has mildly apoplectic after the votes were cast. >> they're filibustering him. that's what they're doing. i'm going to say i'm sorry sorry this has happened. >> john: harry reid showing the lack of outrage and passio
with libyan government officials in the attack. white house official wrote, "secretary clinton called libyan president el-megarif on behalf of the president on the evening of september 11, 2012, to coordinate support to protect americans in libya and access to libyan territory." that angered graham. >> the president of the united states did not make any phone calls to any government official. and libya, the entire period of the attack. he called government officials on september 12, after everybody was dead. >> we would not have gotten answers but for pushing for this. frankly, the more answers we have gotten i think we have shown here that this was a national security failure. >> late today, president obama said chuck hagel is imminently qualified to be secretary of defense. the president says he deserves a vote and predicted eventually he will get confirmed. >> bret: mikes, thanks. we just got word from the pentagon that panetta is heading to california tonight, to monterrey. the ride is also getting bumpy for the president's choice as top spy master. the complication and confusion continu
think it would do for government operations? how badly would it affect your constituents and people across the country? >> well, needless to say, being an appropriator, i think it's an idiotic way to do business. these are indiscriminate cuts. they're not thought through but are automatic across the board without any consideration of good, bad or evil, or whatever. so i think the cuts are devastating. i'm sad to see it take place but i don't see an effort being made realistically to stop it. >> do you, mr. chairman, do you think that once the sequester actually takes effect, that people will see the wide ranging implications of this and they would actually start working together to figure out the best way to either avert it or replace it? >> that's my hope. i'm hoping, number one, i was hoping we could avoid it. but after it hits, which i think it will, i think it's going to have a shock effect on so many different programs and agencies and operations of the government that hopefully people will come to their senses and reach a realistic goal. >> what's one of the effects that you t
, a lot of these congressmen who have been in government for a while, and some of the new ones are doing the job that they were sent there to do. they are representing the constituency from where they are from. the democrats do the same. i know we have differences on both sides of the aisle, but i believe that being able to -- being able to work together and coming together as a nation and congress has a lot to do with barack obama as the president. he was reelected. he needs to be in the white house. he needs to lead this nation. he does not need to be out in campaign mode. that is all i have seen from barack obama. campaign, speech -- let's get everybody in the white house, and let's get things done. guest: a couple of points -- we hear this from constituents, that they are frustrated that they are not seeing the leadership. what he is saying really plays into that. leaders are team builders. they know how to bring people forward to find consensus. the president's speech the other night was all about the president and about his plans. it was not about the items that are on the wrong tr
areas are worse than others. the government has a compelling interest to address this. they need to try to put rules on the table, not to take away the second amendment, but to enforce more rules to negate these happenings. host: the president several times reiterating that the proposal deserves a vote. what he think? caller: i agree. congress is our lawmakers. they put things in place and have to have a vote on this. i agree it should come to that. i believe in the second amendment. we have to make concessions here. host: do you think that congress will take up the votes and what the president is proposing? what do you ultimately think will, of that? caller: i think it will come to a decision. it has become very imperative to do something about it. at this time i think they are going to come to a fair decision across the board, how to address this and put rules in place that we have to negate thkis from happening. host: jim from twitter says this -- "vote on it and move it down, and then move onto something important." we go to ralph on the democrat'' line. caller: i agree with the aut
saw with his nomination something truly extraordinary, the government of iran formally and publicly praising the nomination of a defense secretary. >> i would say he's endorsed by them. you can't get any closeyer then that. chris: that was the backdrop by 9:00 that night when the president told the same republicans the country expects more. >> they don't expect those of us in this chamber to agree on every issue. but they do expect us to put the nation's interests before party. chris: that was the presint, michael, but historically speaking, you're the expert. why does the president speak so grandly of bipartisanship? and a new day has dawned and so many in the republican party seem to say no, tpwhever had an election. there's still a divide? >> he said because the party does not have the house. probably talking very differently if they did. the other thing, chris, especially after re-election, the opposition party is usually pretty angry they lost it. 1937 republicans tried to cut down franklin roosevelt in congress, bringing his mandate down to size. democrats try to do the same t
crime and the like and the fact we have expressly prohibited certain agencies of government of doing any research into gun violence, how to reduce it, we don't think twice about reducing -- calling for research in reducing epidemics and reducing the incidents of disease. can you talk from a public health perspective about the problem of gunshot deaths in our country and what you think we need to do to address it? >> sure. as i indicated in my testimony, i think from a policy standpoint, really the most important thing is that we currently make it way too easy for criminals to get guns. and there are some commonsense ways to address that. we need comprehensive background checks. we are never going to be effective without that. as is indicated by the numbers, it's difficult to prosecute them and that's frankly by design. the laws are written in a way to minimize accountability for those who are buying and selling firearms. i think that's very wrong-headed. i have several studies that i've conducted that showed very consistent evidence that states that have greater measures to hold firearm
than they did in 2010 because the money made available to the labour welsh government has been used to fund their pet project to secure their majority in the assembly. does the prime minister share my concern that hard-working families in wales are being used in order to fund the labour party's pork-barrel policy in cardiff bay? >> my honorable friend makes a very good point. this government have made available money for a council tax freeze. that has the consequence that money for that freeze is available in wales, so people in wales will know who to blame if their council tax is not frozen. it is the labour assembly government in wales: they are to blame; they are the ones who are charging hard-working people more for their council tax. >> we all remember the prime minister's promise last october that he would legislate to force energy companies to put customers on the lowest tariff. will he explain why his energy bill contains no such commitment and why he has broken that promise? >> i have to tell the honorable gentleman that he is completely wrong. the energy bill does exactly
. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the president to name susan crawford as the next chair of the federal communications commission. "prospect" magazine named her one of the "top ten brains of the digital future," and susan crawford served for a time as a special assistant to president obama for science, technology and innovation. right now she teaches communications law at the benjamin cardozo school of law here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, w
include an official from the government accountability office which listed several areas under dhs control in his most recent high-risk list. the report highlights government programs and agencies that may be vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement or are most in need of brought before. this hearing should get underway in just a moment. live coverage here on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee on homeland security subcommittee on oversight and management officials will come to order. the purpose of this hearing is to examine the efficiency of the department of homeland security and how wisely their spending taxpayer dollars. let me begin by extending a warm welcome to other members of the subcommittee. i'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian ter
government checks, handouts and programs. that would be the way to save this country, in my opinion. that's the way to help poor people and i resent the fact that those of us who have a different view of how to help poor people somehow don't care about them. compassion and help for the poor and struggling amounts to more than just borrowing money and sending out more money in the form of checks. my goal is to help working americans from the social and economic harm that is caused by policies i think of this president and the senate majority. these programs have not worked in places like baltimore. one in three residents in baltimore are living in poverty. there are solutions to these problems and we can do better, we have to do better, we cannot continue on this course. so compassion demands change. our goal must be to help more americans find gainful employment and let them support themselves, their family and to prosper. before closing my remarks, i would like to address a serious challenge we will be facing. we have to consider the immigration questions, and studies show the $2.5 trill
because the government itself is a consistent obstacle. the national federation of independent businesses recently released figures from december indicating the mood of businesses is at a recession level. 70% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the
and still get a government subsidy under obamacare. obamacare is destroying health care in this country and people are leaving the private sector, because their companies cannot afford to offer obamacare and if you want to look at ways to find $1.2 trillion in savings over the next decade, look at obamacare, don't destroy the military and cut blindly across the board. there are many ways to do it but the president is the commander in chief and on his watch we'll begin to unravel the finest military in the history of the world, at a time when we need it most, the iranians are watching us, we are allowing people to be destroyed in syria and i'm disappointed in or commander-in-chief. >> chris: senator graham, thank you and thanks for joining us today. we'll talk about sequestration and the hagel nomination. up next, the voice of the tea party, senator rand paul, who gave his own response to the president's state of the union speech. ♪ tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 is your old 401k just hanging around? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 consider if rolling it over to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 might let
finally acknowledgedly last week that the president did not make a call to the libyan government on that night when four americans died in benghazi. republicans wanted to know why. i want to ask you you were the deputy national security adviser. it's my understanding, we learned last week, that want president got a briefing early on the afternoon and seemed to have no more participation in anything. we know he didn't talk to the secretary of defense or didn't talk to the c.i.a. chief after that. what was the president dag that night? >> boy i just-- i don't remember it that way bob. and in fact letter we sent to capitol hill earlier this week said that secretary of state clinton called the libyan-- >> schieffer: we know that. >>eeo behalf of the president and we carried out a very robust reaction to the situation on behalf of the-- >> schieffer: were you aware of what was happening? >> throughout the night. not only were we briefing him we were convene the united states government, the deputy's committee and the national security council and i will we worked it throughout the nig
library and roberta -- james hudson, library officials, government officials, colleagues, new friends, old friends, i am simply thrilled and honored to see each of the year tonight. thank you for coming to this library from across the street and from all over the country. it is a joy that to think because of your connection to tom into each other that you are here. finding many of you and your addresses it became a heartwarming experience to learn just how connected you are to each other. and indeed how connected we all are through family, the white house, astra, george mason, the prudential mutual fund board, the hudson institute, the fight for internet freedom and tom's favorite great american pastimes dr. billington thank you for leaving the library with all -- what we we all recognize as the distinction and tear the 21st century and to your great judgment in bringing roberta i shaffer here. during the months of her chairman she has been a wise and important support. i have learned that she is the library and and the executive charge by dr. billington and in fact congressional and natio
matthews said rubio said government is not the answer, but talked about medicare for his mother and a student loan he received that perhaps allow him to be the senator that he is today. what do you make of the conflict there? >> i think that senator rubioey performance is fine. i am not hung up on the water incident. >> the issue of the role of government. >> substantively the short coming to answer the question is he didn't do anything in that speech to expand the tent. the issue that you raise about the role of government is an example of where there koochb compromise, but it hasn't been forth comprehending. he had a good presentation, but the same set of remarks with a different and perhaps more appealing face delivering them. >> as you are talking about the substance, we are talking about the water. it was over 90,000 tweets. his issue about the role of government and we talked about this a lot. there is not just a mote, but there is maybe the grand canyon between the two parties over the role of government. these are ideological differences that will not be solved. >> it re
.?? >> john, said a funny thing. you said no matter how much the government screws up, caltech will still be caltech and m.i.t. will still be m.i.t. outside the beltway, it is a different reality and you talked about public and private partnerships at the local level. can you talk about why they are so important and maybe share your story about how you see the power partnerships? >> i did not mind it versus the real world. i spend most of my time with the company's seen what kind of problems they're having in what they're struggling with. it's true. in the same way that jeff immelt was not worried about only g e come up but there are a lot of companies out there that you do have to worry about. i'm not worried we're going to get left behind in terms of did creating all of these. we have the smartest people in the world at caltech's and m.i.t.'s. we need to work together to bring that to bear so businesses are doing well and we have jobs. that has been my concern for a long time and it continues to be so. this morning, there is a lot of discussion of partnerships. then we heard about netwo
and defend offer security to our people. it's something that is not acceptable. this is what the government is supposed to be doing. the department of defense has absorbed almost $600 million of defense. with the sequestration and the cr problems there we are looking up to over this period of ten years a trillion dollars cut in a can't and it can't take place. mr. chairman, this hearing is critical to allow the joint chiefs to provide their frank and honest assessment about the impact to the services. the loss of capabilities or readiness in the mismatch between the resources and strategy we're going have to work together to ensure that they american people understand how serious this is. that's a reason for the hearing today. last week lead by senator ayotte, senators mccain, graham, and i introduced a bill to mitigate the impact of sequestration through the end of the fiscal year and provide the department with the for examplability to desperately needs to operate under a continuing resolution. it's not a perfect solution. it is better than doing nothing. there is a growing concern that
has been provided without any government subsidy. privatization would lead to a loss of service. there's enough mail volume to continue to provide universal service. we need to consider postage rates of service can tinea. postal rates are low compared to other industrialized countries. this includes for postal services have been privatized. i read slower. we appreciate the leadership of chairman carper and the problem caused a predefined name benefits. did $46 billion for health benefits, something more than enough. senate bill 1789 but is made another important change to offer additional products and services. the federal agencies and local governments make services more accessible. it's a number of ways for the postal service to provide useful services to the public while increasing revenues. these include secure digital mailboxes. they provide banking services for people in need of an expensive and readily available banking services. these changes are necessary. we need to preserve post office is for communities they serve. but these changes, the service can provide services in that
government to work. and i think that's the way he needs to set it up. i didn't think he did that well in his inaugural address but i think he has another chance here, and if he can make it seem as if, you know, resisting him on finding an alternative to sequestration is being the party of no, the party of the wreckers, i think he's got him in a corner. >> i think if he does go over their heads in congress, which is what he's trying to do on every issue, taking a page from ronald reagan's playbook, i think he can succeed. >> i think what is going to be immigration and gun control is big themes in the inaugural and think those will be the headlines. he traditionally always focused much more on domestic issues, especially at this point. chris: but on the defense stuff, if this country has to suffer a huge cut in manpower, a huge cut in force levels, it seems like it will weaken him politically. >> panetta said furloughing 800,000 civilians will have an impact on the economy, a lot of people. >> jason clapper said our ability to monitor terrorist threats coming at us through intelligence program
government and the previous one. the latest figures show people -- at 600 pounds per pupil per year less than english average. the worst in the entire country. does the prime minister agree that this is simply unfair? will you support our school campaign and pledged to end this discrepancy in this parliament? >> prime minister spent i will look carefully at what my honorable friend said. what -- we have protected the schools budget so that the per pupil funding is the same throughout this parliament. so head teachers can plan on the basis, and by encouraging academy schools and preschools we are making sure that schools get more of the education money going directly to them. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the isf describes the chance was benefits cut is giving with one hand and taking away with many others. does the prime minister think that the sister on hard-working families were at the same time he is giving to millionaires with both hands? >> i don't agree with the honorable lady but that's what the isf saves it as i quoted the lastly, the isf point out that actually the highest increase in t
economy is taken by the federal government. he didn't say any of this. he didn't say any of this because it's embarrassing. it's a disaster. >>brian: he's got 52% approval rating but 54% of the people say they're on the wrong track. it is how you describe your family. the american public likes him personally and they factor in what can you do about it? we like him and we're going to take the job performance away from the likeability. >>steve: most republicans -- >>brian: it's almost as if what can you do? he's our president and i like him personally, so i'm not going to hold him responsible for the food stamps and unemployment, the lack of economic growth or diminishing standing around the world, the shrinking of our military. >>gretchen: we talked about how the polls even before the election seemed to say, the most recent one ing probleming, 83% think in the country. yet to listen to the state of the union it was about more spending. there is this disconnect, cognitive distance, family relations, whatever you want to call it. >>steve: the fact that the president was pushing a very liber
to you. does the gop know how to do anything other than say no? i mieean, are they even really governing party? >> well, they're certainly not a governing party. you have to win national elections to govern. they're not going to do that. they're not going to be a governing party until they figure out how to do that, win national elections. what mitch mcconnell is good at here is being an advocate for filibuster reform. i was glad to see the president come out and say there is no 60 vote threshold and that most bills, especially secretaries, deserve an up or down vote. if obama had done that during a filibuster debate, then we might not be having this debate right now. the deal harry reid cut with mitch mcconnell is coming back to bite them. they could have gone for a lot more. they backed off. they shook hands again and went with something milder and then boom, he gets clowned two mornts later. >> nia malika, i want to be real clear. the filibuster has been around for decades. but its use has exploded in this past few years. in fact, two of the three sessions of congress with the worst f
things but in part on negotiations with the government of afghanistan over legal protections for our troops. the president has made clear that then missions of residual u.s. presence in afghanistan after 2014 will be limited to current terrorism operations and training and advising afghan forces. general austin would bring exceptional experience in overseeing this transition, having commanded u.s. forces in iraq during the reduction of u.s. forces and equipment from iraq. just this past weekend our forces in afghanistan have had a change of command, with general joseph duckworth replacing general john allen as commander of the international securities systems forces and commander of u.s. forces afghanistan. i want to take this opportunity to thank general allen for his thoughtful and devoted leadership in afghanistan, for his forthrightness and his interactions with me and the rest of the members of this committee. when senator reid and i visited afghanistan in january, we saw a real signs of progress, including the afghan security forces increasingly taking the lead responsibility f
presidency as his path to improve the economy. he claimed that the new government spending would not add to the alarming deficit that we already have. here is some of last night. >> nothing i'm proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. it is not a bigger government we need but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad based growth. [applause] martha: let's bring in stuart varney. stuart, what the president is proposing is it really paid for? it is hard to imagine how that could be. >> well the president is proposing a big increase in government spending. that's how he thinks we're going to get growth in the economy. he is basically saying that it is the private sector that has got to pay for it. there is a long list of items, martha. number one, he wants universal preschool. not a word how that would be paid for. that is a big new entitlement program. number two, $50 billion of road and bridge building. three, one billion dollars spent on 15 manufacturing hubs where up-and-coming manufacturing technology would be encouraged. a billion dollars th
it on the table. you can make $86,000 a year in income and still get a government subsidy under obama care. people are leaving the private sector because the companies can't afford to offer obama care. if you want to look at ways to find $1.2 trillion in savings over the next decade let's look at obama care. let's don't detroy the military and cut blindly across the board. the president promised it wouldn't happen. he is the commander in chief. on his watch we will begin to unravel the finest military in the history of the world at a time we need it most. the iranians are watching us and we are allowing people to be destroyed and slaughtered in syria. i'm disappointed in our commander in chief. >> chris: senator graham thanks for joining us today. we will follow both the sequestration and the hagel nomination. up next, the voice of the tea party. senator rand paul who gave his own response to the president's is state of the union speech. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪
is when one side or the other -- which it has a perfect right to do under our system of government -- decides to try to kill a nomination by denying 60 votes or to stop legislation by 60 votes. the democrats have done it on a regular basis when they were in the minority, and the distinguished majority leader was one of the most effective persons in -- in the senate at doing that. i presided many times over the senate when he objected. i remember the -- you know, when we were trying to get 60 votes to -- to have a permanent change in the estate law and we'd get up to 57 or 58 or 59 and the distinguished majority leader would object. now, what are we doing today? we're doing today exactly what was said when the vote was called. the question was, do 60 of us believe that it's time to end debate on the nomination of the president to be secretary of defense, the leader of the largest military organization in the world, the largest employer in the united states, and the senate armed services committee has reported that recommendation to the senate two days ago? not ten days ago, not 15 d
think they see more government, more spending and they flinch from it. it is a very popular issue. i think it was a smart one for the president to pick. i've heard some theorizing that he may be setting up some kind of a deal on a very popular program that republicans can sign on to. give again, to go back to the question of letting down the base that wants no entitlement cuts, maybe you introduce new things into equation and say we have this great new early childhood education program but we are going to have to do some benefit cuts, chained cpi and it will be kind of some sugar to make the bitter pill go down more easily. i don't know that republicans are there yet. i still think republicans are looking to shrink government. they see perhaps like this and they recoil and they say it's big government and there are better ways to do it. it would be nice to see some agreement on this because these programs do seem to have a lot of empirical evidence of their success behind them. >> the details are sparse on exactly what the program would entail but it looks like it would be more of th
to build an infrastructure, help the government provide basic services, build trust within a community, help build a secure structure. so these were things did not happen by coincidence. it was all part of this blog. and by the way, when i use the word plot, i generally am not a conspiracy guy. but these people refer to themselves as a plot. they called themselves the cabal, or the west point monkey because a lot of them came out of the social science department of west point, which had a tradition of forming networks among their own graduates. so this was very cautious here and for example, all of this happened not by coincidence. for example, petraeus when he was in leavenworth wasn't just sitting in leavenworth. he had a vast network of old colleagues throughout the pentagon bureaucracy. is reaching out to them. he deliberately forms a back channel. he cultivates this woman in the white house named meghan o'sullivan who was president bush's chief adviser on iraq in the national security council. he sees she's waving from the policy, he cultivates her. they're talking on the phone pr
far. a that left a defendant dead and is the government pressuring people too much to get plea deems. that story is next. to grow, we have to boost our social media visibility. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning today, my son brock and his whole team will be our new senior social media strategists. any questions? since we make radiator valves wouldn't it be better if we just let fedex help us to expand to new markets? hmm gotta admit that's better than a few "likes." i don't have the door code. who's that? he won a contest online to be ceo for the day. how am i supposed to run a business here without an office?! [ male announcer ] fast, reliable deliveries worldwide. fedex. >> shannon: the process of piling on charges to force a plea bargain has become to common place among prosecutors that throwing the book at a defendant is a bit of a cliche these days. is it always the fairest way to find justice. in some legal scholars say the current system encourages prosecutors to stack the deck. >> before aaron schwartz committed suicide. federal prosecutors charged him with 13 counts o
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